Back to the egg

When I was young I was given Wings’ Back to the Egg LP as a present.

Apart from being one of Wings’ best albums, I loved the art (the LP had a fried egg on both sides right in the middle with the legend: “Sunny side up” on one of them). Funnily enough, the song Yesterday was initially called Scrambled eggs after Paul McCartney dreamt the tune (or so he says).

I have recently tried a few proper recipes to make them and I bumped into this one by one of my heroes, Gordon Ramsay:


PERFECT is the only word that can do them justice.

You’d think making scrambled eggs is easy enough. Well, Gordon goes for a method that does everything the other way round and the result is, as he well puts it… sublime. The eggs cooked in this way are creamy and subtle beyond belief.

It will appear that the eggs will never ever set. Don’t despair! And, above all, do NOT turn up the heat. They will come together.

Paraphrasing another blog, “he has changed the way I cook scrambled eggs forever”. Try them, you won’t be sorry.


gordon-scrambled-eggs-blog

Sublime scrambled eggs on toast adapted from Gordon Ramsay Makes it Easy by Gordon Ramsay

Serves 2-3

6 large free-range eggs
25g ice-cold butter, cut into small dice
1 tbsp crème fraîche
freshly ground sea salt and pepper
few chives, snipped
2-3 chunky slices of rustic bread, such as pain Polaîne, to serve

1. Break the eggs into a cold, heavy-based pan, place on the lowest heat possible, and add half the butter. Using a spatula, stir the eggs frequently to combine the yolks with the whites.
2. As the mixture begins to set, add the remaining butter. The eggs will take about 4-5 minutes to scramble – they should still be soft and quite lumpy. Don’t let them get too hot – keep moving the pan off and back on the heat.
3. Meanwhile, toast the bread.
4. Add the crème fraîche and season the eggs at the last minute, then add the snipped chives. Put the toast on warm plates, pile the softly scrambled eggs on top and serve immediately.



After I did Gordon’s version I had to try Bill Granger’s.

After all Bill became famous for his scrambled eggs so I definitely had to give them a go!


The recipe I used was the one that appears in his website: http://www.bills.com.au/recipes/recipe1.htm

Despite all his remarks and explanations, it wasn’t quite up to standards. For example, Bill says the heat should be high and I remain convinced that low heat works best. With high heat my eggs were dangerously close to becoming an omelette instead!

Bill’s scrambled eggs – adapted from a recipe by Bill Granger

Serves 1

2 eggs

1/3 cup (2 fl. oz) cream (I used soured cream)

a pinch of salt (I also seasoned the eggs with freshly milled black pepper)

10g (¼ oz butter)

Place the eggs, cream and salt in a bowl and whisk together.

Melt the butter in a non-stick frying pan over high heat, taking care not to burn the butter. Pour in egg mixture and cook for 20 seconds, or until gently set around the edge. Stir the eggs with a wooden spoon, gently bringing the egg mixture on the outside of the pan to the centre. The idea is to fold the eggs rather than to scramble them. Leave to cook for 20 seconds longer and repeat the folding process. When the eggs are just set (remembering they will continue cooking as they rest), turn out onto a plate and serve with hot toast.

Note: If you are making more than two serves of scrambled eggs, make sure you cook separate batches so as not to crowd the frying pan.

So which version did I like the best? I have great respect for Bill as the recipes I have tried so far have turned out very tasty but in this case I think I’ll stick to Gordon’s.

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